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Elon Musk Says Tesla Has Designed a James Bond-Style Submarine Car

One of the James Bond series’ many classic scenes sees a car chase end with the famous spy crashing off the end of a pier into the ocean.

In a move as smooth as a shaken martini 007 turns the car into a submarine, allowing for a swift escape from danger.

It turns out that Elon Musk, apparently not content with being dubbed the real-life Iron Man, also has his own submarine model car lying around at Tesla HQ.

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Musk’s aquatic car

The subject came up at this week’s annual Tesla shareholder meeting, in which Musk also said the electric vehicle company is on course to have “a record quarter.”

During the meeting, held in Mountain View, Calif, a shareholder asked Musk if Tesla had considered making an aquatic car that could travel on roads as well as becoming a submarine.

It turns out that the electric vehicle company did, in fact, create a design inspired by James Bond’s Lotus Esprit submarine car featured in the Roger Moore-starring ‘The Spy Who Loved Me’. 

Musk said it is technically feasible to make a working version, though he did say that “the market for this would be small — small, but enthusiastic,” adding that he personally thought it was “the coolest thing.”

Musk does, of course, have a lot on his plate with his many technology ventures including Space X, Tesla, and the Boring Company. He suggested that making a Bond-style submarine car would distract from his other work, though he left the possibility open that Tesla might someday make it as a show car.

Tesla’s James Bond connections

Musk is, in fact, the proud owner of the real-life “Wet Nellie”, the car made by Perry Oceanographic Inc. as a custom submarine for the James Bond movie.

The “Wet Nellie” uses the Lotus Esprit S1 sports car model as its framework. In its early years, before Musk was Tesla CEO, the EV company partnered with Lotus to make the first model of the now-famous Roadster.

We might not be seeing a Tesla aquatic car any time soon, though it’s not out of the realms of possibility.

Source: Interesting Engineering